Word Games

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I just finished reading the DaVinci Code, and I feel like I'm coming up from under a heavy blanket in which time and reality have been suspended. It was hard to know where to draw the line between what's historically real in the book and what Brown has drawn upon in creating the tapestry of symbolism, art, religion, and cryptography that form the backbone of the mystery at the center of the book.

I hate to admit that I'd never heard of PHI before. It's a fascinating and mind-boggling principle, especially as delineated in the book, and especially as the number plays out in the natural world around us. I haven't yet, but did find myself tempted to drag out a tape measure. (I've got several! It's sort of a new [and very practical, especially when it comes to knitting] collection of mine.) and measure some of the anatomical examples noted in the book. I'm also feeling like I need a crash course in art history (or, even better, a whirlwind trip to the Louvre!). And if I didn't spend so much time knitting (and blogging and reading blogs and making lists of things to do), maybe I could spend more time playing cool word games. I remember when I was younger and spent a lot of time with a GAMES magazine doing just that. But, admittedly, not to the degree of the deceased art curator in the book.

Let's see…

T H R E A D E D T H O U G H T S

THOUGHT AT RED SHED

THE SHARED THOUGHT D

DA SHRED THE THOUGHT

D HEARD THE THOUGHTS

THE DOUGH. THE DARTS.


Okay, that took a long time and only feels so-so successful. I can only imagine how long it would take to make an anagram of major artistic masterpieces!

(Hey, give it a shot. What's a good anagram for your blog's name?)

So, back to my reading experience...

In the beginning, I worried about not knowing where to draw the line between reality and fiction. But, as I got further and further into the book, I decided I didn't really want to know where the line appears. The answers, I'm sure, were just a click away from me, but I like savoring the experience of the book as a whole without knowing what's historically accurate and what's not.

The only thing I do feel compelled to do at some point is take a closer look at "The Last Supper."

I just did. Wow.

2 Comments

I felt exactly the same way coming out of reading The Da Vinci Code (I had the hardest time putting it down--I think I finished in just a few days). When I first started reading it I was eager to research all of the principles and artwork being brought up (because I'm like that), but then I decided that it added to the mystery to be constantly surprised by those things.

I have an excellent education, but books like Da Vinci Code make me feel woefully ignorant.
Kinks can't K.....sheesh, don't get me started!

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